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Reins

Jesus Take the Reins by Lyndsie Bourgon.

In the fast-growing cowboy church movement, the trappings of traditional worship are eschewed to entice people through the door, dung-covered boots and all.

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Reboot?

Out of the Ashes by Lewis Dartnell.

It took a lot of fossil fuels to forge our industrial world. Now they’re almost gone. Could we do it again without them?

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Management

The Management Myth by Matthew Stewart.

Most of management theory is inane, writes our correspondent, the founder of a consulting firm. If you want to succeed in business, don’t get an M.B.A. Study philosophy instead.

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Cosmo

Cosmopolitan Hates For Women To Orgasm If Men Enjoy It Too by Robert Tracinski.

Cosmopolitan has a long history of giving young women bad advice about how to deal with the young men in their lives, but they really outdid themselves with this spectacularly bad advice: “Why Guys Get Turned on When You Orgasm—and Why That’s a Bad Thing.”

Wait, what?

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Freedom

Neil Gorsuch, the Supreme Court, and Religious Freedom by Richard W. Garnett.

A little over a year ago, Associate Justice Antonin Scalia died. Justice Scalia was among the most consequential jurists in American history. For many traditional religious believers, mainstream Republicans, and conservative intellectuals, the Supreme Court vacancy created by Scalia’s death was an important—perhaps the strongest—reason to vote for Donald J. Trump in the recent election. And, for those to whom the balance and future of the Court mattered greatly, questions about religious freedom, church-state relations, and the role of religious believers and institutions in the public square loomed particularly large.

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Liberalism

The New Yorker reviews Age of Anger by Pankaj Mishra, A Culture of Growth by Joel Mokyr, and Homo Deus by Yuval Noah Harari.

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Mayhem

No Thug Left Behind by Katherine Kersten.

Obsessed with “racial equity,” St. Paul schools abandoned discipline—and unleashed mayhem.

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Prophetic

The Last Hollow Laugh by Paul Sagar.

Since Francis Fukuyama proclaimed ‘The End of History’ 25 years ago, he has been much maligned. His work now seems prophetic.

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Prescription II

The Benedict Option and the Way of Exchange by Alan Jacobs.

Surely there has never been a richer and more deeply faithful model of Christian faith and practice than that offered by the leaders of the Church in Roman Cappadocia in the fourth and fifth centuries. Think of Basil the Great, exhorting the rich of Caesarea to “empty their barns” to feed the poor, building hospitals for the sick, upholding Trinitarian orthodoxy against the Arians, teaching young Christians the right uses of pagan literature. And Basil was only one among many great ones, even in his own neighborhood: His sister Macrina, his brother Gregory of Nyssa, his friend Gregory of Nazianzus, were all titans of faith and charity, and built a thoroughgoing Christian culture the likes of which the Church has rarely if ever seen.

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Prescription?

Not Benedictine Enough: Rod Dreher’s Diagnosis and Prescription for American Christianity by Nathaniel Peters.

If the Benedict Option is just Christianity, it is neither inherently Benedictine nor is it optional. If it is a feeling and an intuition, it needs to be guided by careful thought.

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Epidemic

The Night Shift by Jacob Silverman.

The true cause of our sleeplessness epidemic.

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Locke?

Jefferson, Locke, and the Declaration of Independence by Robert Curry.

Although Christopher Hitchens was often cheerfully iconoclastic, his 2005 biography of Thomas Jefferson affirmed the scholarly and popular consensus: the Declaration of Independence is based on John Locke’s ideas.

But is it?

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Oman

Oman: The Middle East’s Most Surprising Country by Daniel Pipes.

Oman, where I have spent the past week, is an Arab country unlike any other.

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Psychedelic

The Psychedelic Miracle by Mac McClelland.

How some doctors are risking everything to unleash the healing power of MDMA, ayahuasca and other hallucinogens.

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Attachment

Responding to your Partner’s Attachment Style by David Ludden.

The Golden Rule doesn’t always work in marriage.

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Casanova

The Real Casanova by Laurence Bergreen.

His name is synonymous with serial seduction but Casanova’s memoirs reveal a man greater than the sum of his ‘conquests.’

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Simple

Relationships Made Simple by Grant H. Brenner.

14 core principles bring clarity to a hazy subject.

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Avoidance

Information Avoidance by Russell Golman, David Hagmann, and George Loewenstein.

We commonly think of information as a means to an end. However, a growing theoretical and experimental literature suggests that information may directly enter the agent’s utility function. This can create an incentive to avoid information, even when it is useful, free, and independent of strategic considerations. We review research documenting the occurrence of information avoidance, as well as theoretical and empirical research on reasons why people avoid information, drawing from economics, psychology, and other disciplines. The review concludes with a discussion of some of the diverse (and often costly) individual and societal consequences of information avoidance.

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Anonymous

Cover of Darkness by Jamie Bartlett.

The cypherpunks are winning the crypto-war against government spies. What will happen when everyone is anonymous?

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Laugh

How To Laugh At God by Stephen Akey.

It’s hard to know exactly what moment we occupy in regard to the New Atheism and its concomitant backlash. Are we in the backlash of the backlash? Or the backlash of the backlash of the backlash? As Tim Whitmarsh shows in his recent Battling the Gods: Atheism in the Ancient World, this debate is about two thousand years old; I don’t propose to resolve it today or tomorrow. I do, however, have a modest suggestion: Instead of riling up ourselves and our antagonists any further, we atheists might direct at least some of our righteousness into good-humored mockery of a perfectly harmless figure whose feelings can’t be hurt: God.

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