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Extremes

Democrats Are Still Rushing to Extremes by Evan Siegfried.

You would think that after losing over 1,000 elected positions at the federal, state and local levels since 2010, Democratic Party leaders — now out of power in the White House and both houses of Congress — might be hard at work crafting a message that would broaden the party’s appeal and move away from the conspiracy-addled angry radicalism of its base.

You would be wrong.

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Architecture

Room for Sex by Richard J Williams.

Most architecture sets out to make us civil and efficient. Where are the homes that give us passion and pleasure?

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Politicizing

The Real “Anti-Science” by Wesley J. Smith.

When Bill Nye the Science Guy complains of a war being waged on science, he should look in the mirror. Nye, who is actually the mechanical engineering guy—that’s his educational background—is more guilty of undermining science (properly understood) by politicizing it than almost anyone this side of Al Gore.

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Cowards

Will Fascism Come to America through Its Colleges and Universities? by Roger L Simon.

If fascism comes to America, it will be through our college and university system.

The biggest cowards in our country today are many, if not most, of our college and university administrators followed closely by a fair amount of their faculty. They are allowing their institutions to be taken over by a monolithic world view that is increasingly totalitarian and antithetical to the diversity of opinion on which the search for truth depends.

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Fun

Are We Having Too Much Fun? by Megan Garber.

In 1985, Neil Postman observed an America imprisoned by its own need for amusement. He was, it turns out, extremely prescient.

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Knowledge

The Usefulness of Useless Knowledge by Donald L. Drakeman.

Abraham Flexner, founder of the Institute for Advanced Study, has much to teach modern researchers—not only about seeking knowledge for its own sake, but also about effective fundraising and private philanthropy.

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Study

Dartmouth Study Finds Democrats Are The Least Tolerant Students On Campus by Bre Payton.

A new survey of students at Dartmouth College found that those who identified as Democrats are the least tolerant on campus.

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Pity

Pity the Poor Monster by Theodore Dalrymple.

France must ask itself why Karim Cheurfi was out of prison.

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Grievance

Bill Nye and the Politics of Grievance by Ben Domenech.

We must not fall into the trap of thinking speech that offends is speech that must be forbidden. A healthy culture demands that much of us.

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Exploitation

Trading on the Female Body: Surrogacy, Exploitation, and Collusion by the US Government by Kathleen Sloan.

Commercial surrogacy is the ultimate manifestation of the American neoliberal project of capitalist commodification of human life to create profit and fulfill the narcissistic desires of an entitled elite.

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Needed

When Philosophy Needed Muslims, Jews and Christians Alike by Peter Adamson.

If you were asked to name the most important philosopher of 10th-century Baghdad, you would presumably not hesitate to say ‘al-Farabi’. He’s one of the few thinkers of the Islamic world known to non-specialists, deservedly so given his ambitious reworking of Platonic and Aristotelian metaphysics and political philosophy. But if you were yourself a resident of 10th-century Baghdad, you might more likely think of Yahya ibn ‘Adi. He is hardly a household name now, but was mentioned by the historian al-Mas‘udi as the only significant teacher of Aristotelian philosophy in his day. But ibn ‘Adi is not just a good example of how fame wanes across the centuries. He is also a fine illustration of the inter-religious nature of philosophy in the Islamic world.

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Problem

Our Quantum Problem by Adrian Kent.

When the deepest theory we have seems to undermine science itself, some kind of collapse looks inevitable.

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Basis?

PD reviews Liberal Politics and Public Faith: Beyond Separation by Kevin Vallier.

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Divide

The French, Coming Apart by Christopher Caldwell.

A social thinker illuminates his country’s populist divide.

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Fascists

Sorry, College Kids, There’s No Such Thing As Hate Speech by John Daniel Davidson.

For the sake of campus protestors and their professors across the country, it’s time to make something clear: there’s no such thing as hate speech.

That should go without saying, since freedom of speech and free inquiry is supposed to be what college is all about. But the recent spate of violent student protests, from the University of California at Berkeley to Middlebury College in Vermont, have been met with a collective shrug from an alarming number of college students, professors, and administrators who seem to be under the impression that violence is okay so long as its purpose is to silence “hate speech.”

By hate speech, they mean ideas and opinions that run afoul of progressive pieties. Do you believe abortion is the taking of human life? That’s hate speech. Think transgenderism is a form of mental illness? Hate speech. Concerned about illegal immigration? Believe in the right to bear arms? Support President Donald Trump? All hate speech.

But in fact, there is no “hate speech” exception to the First Amendment. The answer to the question, “Where does free speech stop and hate speech begin?” is this: nowhere. For the purposes of the First Amendment, there is no difference between free speech and hate speech. Ideas and opinions that progressive students and professors find offensive or “hateful” are just as protected by the Bill of Rights as anti-Trump slogans chanted at a campus protest.

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Sisters

Meet the Sisters Who Ran ‘the Most Famous and Luxurious House of Prostitution in the Country’ by Nina Renata Aron.

Chicago’s Everleigh Club hosted celebrities and princes. Its owners made millions.

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Wager

Douthat’s Wager: Go to Church, Even If You Don’t Believe by Jonathan Malesic.

If you are a secular liberal who made your twice-yearly trip to church on Easter Sunday, you took an important step toward improving your life, your political philosophy, and your community, according to New York Times columnist Ross Douthat. The next step is to go back, not just at Christmas, but every Sunday from now on.

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Journey

God in the Machine: My Strange Journey into Transhumanism by Meghan O’Gieblyn.

After losing her faith, a former evangelical Christian felt adrift in the world. She then found solace in a radical technological philosophy – but its promises of immortality and spiritual transcendence soon seemed unsettlingly familiar.

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Integrity

Of March and Myth: The Politicizing of Science by Sylvia R. Karasu.

Scientific integrity, self-correction, and the public.

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Fueled

How Late-Night Comedy Fueled the Rise of Trump by Caitlin Flanagan.

Sneering hosts have alienated conservatives and made liberals smug.

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