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Harassment

When Do Men With Power Engage in Sexual Harassment? by Gwendolyn Seidman.

Beginning with famed Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein, numerous powerful men have recently been accused of sexual harassment. Many people were shocked and dismayed that so many men would abuse their power in this way. But of course, not all powerful men are sexual harassers. So why might some powerful men be more likely than others to sexually harass their subordinates? Research, including a new paper published just this past month, points to three possible reasons.

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Inferior

Study Suggests Medicaid Is A ‘Persistently Inferior’ Form Of Health Coverage by Christopher Jacobs.

A new study suggests Medicaid provides inferior outcomes in the nation’s largest state, raising more questions about the program that represents the bulk of Obamacare’s coverage expansion.

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CDBG

Let’s Kill the CDBG by Steven Malanga.

Nothing in President Donald Trump’s first federal budget, issued earlier this year, produced more howls of indignation than the proposal to kill off a remnant of the War on Poverty known as the Community Development Block Grant program, or CDBG. Politicians, advocates, the liberal media, and executives of nonprofits that receive these often-sizable grants denounced Trump’s plan as devastating. For Jesse Jackson, ending the program meant that Trump had betrayed his pledge to rebuild black urban communities. A Cleveland councilman said that Trump’s proposal would cause a “crisis” in his city, while Boston mayor Marty Walsh warned that the “reckless” cuts would “bring pain.” Democratic senator Tom Udall of New Mexico was “appalled”; his Connecticut counterpart Chris Murphy predicted “utter disaster” for his state. Newspapers nationwide published hundreds of articles about the local initiatives that would die if Trump got his way. Reporters often pointed to what the loss of the grants would mean to communities that had voted heavily for Trump.

The overheated rhetoric came in defense of one of the nation’s most wasteful and ineffective domestic-spending programs. Conceived in the early 1970s as a way to give local officials a say in how federal poverty aid gets doled out, the CDBG has sent some $150 billion to impoverished neighborhoods in Baltimore, Buffalo, Newark, and other struggling cities, with little or nothing positive to show for it. Worse, the CDBG has created a local patronage racket, funding politically connected nonprofits that do little to spur economic development. And to build further support, Congress extended CDBG funding to wealthier areas, so that grants now help build tennis courts and swimming pools in neighborhoods with above-average incomes.

White House budget director Mike Mulvaney stated the obvious when he complained that the grants “have been identified as . . . not showing any results. We can’t do that anymore. We can’t spend money on programs just because they sound good.” The Trump administration is right: it’s time for the CDBG to go.

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Revival

Freud in the Scanner by M M Owen.

A revival of interest in the power of introspection and thought has brought Freud’s ideas back into the scientific fold.

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Impasse

The Impasse Between Modernism and Postmodernism by Patrick Lee Miller.

Buying textbooks, writing syllabi, and putting on armor. This is how many students and teachers prepared to return to campus this past fall. The last few years have witnessed an intensifying war for the soul of the university, with many minor skirmishes, and several pitched battles. The most dramatic was last spring at Evergreen State, shortly before the end of the spring semester. Perhaps the most dramatic since then have been at Reed College and Wilfrid Laurier University. There is no shortage of examples, filling periodicals left and right. Wherever it next explodes, this war promises more ferocity, causing more casualties—careers, programs, ideals.

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Luke

How Bill Walton, Phil Jackson and Steve Kerr shaped Luke Walton by Ohm Youngmisuk.

There are times when Rob Pelinka will walk down the hallway from his office in the UCLA Health Training Center, past Magic Johnson’s office where a flat screen television is almost always on ESPN, and down to Luke Walton’s office.

Sometimes, the sounds of the Grateful Dead and other ’70s classic rock will be blaring out of the head coach’s office as Walton gets “in the zone.” Other times, Pelinka will find the room as quiet as a library with Walton deep in meditation.

“I usually keep going when I see that,” the Los Angeles Lakers’ general manager said, laughing. “Man, I keep it moving. I wait until he is back in the present.”

However, Luke Walton’s present is deeply connected to his past and to a collection of champions who had the most influence on his life: From his father, Hall of Famer Bill Walton, to his longtime coach and mentor, 11-time champion Phil Jackson, to his first professional sideline boss, Steve Kerr, who collected five rings as a player and already has two more with the Warriors.

It takes a certain type of unflappable personality to handle coaching in the entertainment capital of the world with a point guard who has Hollywood-sized hype and comes with the most opinionated father in all of sports. Perhaps the type of even-keeled personality that has been molded by Walton’s eclectic championship collection of mentors.

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Meltdown

Thank Separating Sex From Morality For The Great American Sexual Meltdown by Curt Anderson.

Many people have asked me, “What is world is going on here, with Roy Moore, John Conyers, Joe Barton, Al Franken, Matt Lauer, and all the others?” I’ll tell you what is going on: moral truth is dead in America.

It’s been a long time coming, but the bill is coming due for the hip and progressive sexual revolution in America. The sexual abuse and harassment sweepstakes we are witnessing today is the direct result of our society deciding that Christian morality is narrow, repressive, and above all, not cool.

If it feels good do it. Have whatever sexual relationships you want, when you want, with whoever you want. That is and has been the prevailing societal view for decades, and it permeates our music, art, film, literature, social media, and conversations. There is nothing right or wrong. Oh, sure, folks will say it is wrong to hurt other people. But the truth is, when you throw objective morality out the window, everyone gets hurt.

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Jerusalem

Trump’s Recognition Of Jerusalem Makes ‘Peace’ More Likely by David Harsanyi.

Later today Donald Trump is expected to make a largely symbolic but important gesture, recognizing Jerusalem as the capital of Israel — not as an international capital or shared capital or capital in flux or as any of the other fantasies anti-Israel types have harbored since 1967. The most consequential long-term benefit of the move is that it begins to undercut a myth that’s stood for years.

Palestinian leadership might have deluded their own people for decades, but there is no conceivable peace deal that includes a truly divided Jerusalem. Like the Right of Return, the notion that a part of Jerusalem proper will be handed over to an antagonistic government, much less the remnants of the PLO and their on-and-off political partners Hamas, is a fantasy. This is not a radical Likud position, it’s one of the few issues that all major political parties, left and right, agree on in Israel.

Jerusalem, after all, is not some concocted modern capital. The place itself is the affirmation of the Jewish claim on Israel. Consequently, the coming protests over Trump’s move are not merely about a city, they are about challenging the right of Israel to exist — a self-destructive position that most Palestinians still embrace. This isn’t new. There has been a destructive effort within the Muslim world — although it has been taken up by others, including the United Nations — to deny the religious and historic connection between the city and the Jews. Moving the embassy, even if it entails nothing more than hanging a sign on a new building, is a pushback against attack on an ally.

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14th Amendment

The Fourteenth Amendment and Masterpiece Cakeshop: Equal Citizenship, our Inclusive Republic, and Anglo-American Common Law by Christopher R. Green and David Upham.

Like several other big First Amendment cases the Supreme Court will hear this year, Masterpiece Cakeshop is not really a First Amendment case. By its terms, the First Amendment restrains only “Congress” from making laws abridging “the freedom of speech” or prohibiting “the free exercise” of religion, but the Masterpiece case involves a state law. It is the Fourteenth Amendment, adopted after the Civil War, that restricts the states’ powers over religion or speech. Yet, as in last year’s Trinity Lutheran case, the Fourteenth Amendment has barely been mentioned in the briefing so far.

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Coup

Saudi Arabia’s Earth-Shaking Coup by Myron Magnet.

Can the crown prince remake the kingdom and its religion?

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SCOTUS

The Christian Right Has A New Strategy On Gay Marriage by Amelia Thomson-DeVeaux.

The wedding cake case before the Supreme Court signals a shift in status for evangelicals.

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Plan

God’s Plan for Mike Pence by McKay Coppins.

Will the vice president—and the religious right—be rewarded for their embrace of Donald Trump?

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Hysteria

How Democrats Corrupt English To Create Hysteria by David Harsanyi.

Liberals aren’t just peddling political euphemisms, they are contorting basic truths.

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Apartheid

CJ reviews Islamic Gender Apartheid: Exposing a Veiled War Against Women by Phyllis Chesler.

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Inevitability

The Inevitability of Kamala Harris by David Catanese.

The freshman Democratic senator from California carefully navigates expectations she’ll morph into a 2020 contender.

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Dark Side

There’s a Dark Side to Mindfulness Meditation by Derek Beres.

A new paper published in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin investigates the potential “dark side” to one such technique, mindfulness meditation. This is not a new concept. For thousands of years there have been cases of meditation gone awry in the psychologically and emotionally unstable. And if there’s any environment in which you might suffer such a fate, it’s prison—one of the populations the authors, led by June P Tangney, a clinical psychology professor at George Mason University, focuses on.

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Fierce

Laura Kipnis reviews Be Fierce: Stop Harassment and Take Your Power Back by Gretchen Carlson.

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Aggression

Why Sexual Aggression Is About Both Sex and Power by Gregg Henriques.

Both power and sex play a role in sexual aggression.

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Dereliction

Chicago’s Debt Dereliction by Nicole Gelinas.

The Windy City is using complex bonds to delay a financial reckoning and avoid cleaning up its fiscal mess.

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Criminologists

When Ex-convicts Become Criminologists by Lucas Laursen.

Through their own hard-earned insights, prisoners turned academics aim to reform how convicts and criminology are studied.

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